Welcome to Richard Madden Fan, a fansite dedicated to Richard Madden, Scottish stage, film, and television actor known for portraying Robb Stark in Game of Thrones, Prince Kit in Disney's Cinderella, David Budd in Bodyguard, and most recently, Ikaris in Marvel's Eternals. Please enjoy our site and our gallery with over 35k high quality images.

"I just think of myself as an upstart who is trying to get better at what I do."
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PTSD “is something that people live with everyday,” the actor said. “It can be a really trickling level of anxiety you constantly live with, or paranoia, or panic attacks.”

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER – Golden Globe-winning star of Bodyguard, Richard Madden, told The Hollywood Reporter’s Drama Actor Roundtable he found himself “physically and mentally exhausted” at the end of filming the BBC series. “I need to stop. I need to stop doing this for a while,” Madden thought, after playing a veteran suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

“It weighed very heavy on me,” the actor told the roundtable. “You spend more time in someone else’s clothes, saying someone else’s words, thinking someone else’s thoughts. You do lose a bit of yourself.”

“I’m not a method actor in any way, but you get a huge hangover from this,” he continued. “At the end of this, I felt very isolated and broken, much like the character was.”

To prepare for the role, Madden “spoke to a few soldiers,” but confessed it was “tough, because they really don’t want to talk about it. People don’t want to discuss this at all.”

PTSD “is something that people live with everyday,” said the Scottish actor and former Game of Thrones star. “It can be a really trickling level of anxiety you constantly live with, or paranoia, or panic attacks.” Madden said his goal as an actor was “to humanize [PTSD] within someone who is in complete denial about it.”

Madden joined Hugh Grant, Diego Luna, Sam Rockwell, Stephan James and Billy Porter for the Drama Actor Roundtable. The full roundtable is set to air July 14 on SundanceTV. Follow all the Emmy season roundtables at THR.com/Roundtables.



THR –  BBC’s ‘Doctor Who’ won for best sci-fi and genre-based series, while VH1’s ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ won for best reality series.

The Banff World Media Festival on Monday unveiled the international winners of its Rockie Awards, which continued a traditional shootout between American and British TV producers in the Canadian Rockies.

BBC’s Bodyguard thriller was tapped as best drama, while HBO’s Barry took home the best comedy crown and BBC’s Doctor Who won for best sci-fi and genre-based series.

Elsewhere, HBO’s Sharp Objects won the prize for best limited series, while VH1’s RuPaul’s Drag Race won for best reality series. Also on the comedy front, IFC Films and CBC’s Baroness von Sketch Show collected the Rockie for best comedy and variety program.

The Rockie Awards, for which U.S. TV shows compete against international fare, also gave Baroness von Sketch Show the Rogers Prize for Excellence in Canadian Content.

In all, U.S. producers picked up nine Rockie Awards, followed by U.K. producers with eight and Canadian producers with seven.

The Banff World Media Festival will continue through Wednesday.



There’s out of work, and then there’s out of work. Thanks to the success of ‘Bodyguard’, Richard Madden is enjoying the good kind, kicking back with the world at his feet

Photoshoots > Session 055

 

THE JACKAL – This is not how it should be. Richard Madden, gingerbread-haired and always smouldering, is sitting in the basement of a working men’s club in south-east London, relishing the fact he has absolutely nothing to do. Not now, at least. Tomorrow, the Glaswegian actor is presenting a BAFTA award with his Rocketman co-stars Taron Egerton and Jamie Bell, but he’s so relaxed about it he doesn’t even know the category yet (Special Visual Effects), or the nominees (it goes to Black Panther). The most pressing thing he needs to do today, ahead of an upcoming trip back to the US, is go to his house and locate his razor.

This is not how it should be. Not for the man who played Robb Stark, Game of Thrones’ tragic demi-protagonist whose death at the Red Wedding in 2013 became the TV event of the decade/century/millennium. Once his father, Ned Stark (Sean Bean), lost his head early on in the show’s run, everyone thought Robb Stark would be the new leading man. Maybe it was his hair, tousled and luscious; maybe it was his princely jawline, or his unwavering moral compass. He looked good riding a horse, was that it? This is what a leading man consists of, everyone said. Then he was murdered.

This is not how it should be. Not for the man who played David Budd, central figure in Jed Mercurio’s Bodyguard, the six-part series that brought the country together in an age where we’ve never had more things to watch on TV. It was the biggest Sunday-night drama since Downton Abbey; when a British tabloid ran a spoiler on the front page, the country was up in arms. The show’s distribution in the US on Netflix boosted its profile even further – and Madden
won a Golden Globe. Someone, somewhere whispered Bond and suddenly everyone frothed at the mouth because, of course! To put it another way, it takes him so long to leave the working men’s club, with the pictures, and the adoration, and the swarm of well-wishing locals, that the Bodyguard star may soon need a bodyguard.

‘I had to learn to get over waiting for it to all go to shit.’

 

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VARIETYSPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you have not yet watched “The Bodyguard,” streaming now on Netflix.

In his new BBC thriller “The Bodyguard,” Richard Madden plays a special protection officer tasked with keeping Britain’s Home Secretary safe. But his role isn’t relegated to a stereotypical stoic action hero. His background as an army veteran provides layers of emotion that Madden reveals in different doses.

“Trying to get the physicality right of someone who’s a professional bodyguard and has been in the army for many years…is a completely different challenge,” Madden tells Variety. “And then I suppose in lots of ways it was a great relief playing the more emotional scenes because this character spends so much time covering his emotions or holding them in.”

Here, Madden talks with Variety about playing with ambiguity for his character, the challenged of shooting a suicide scene and how response to his new show compares to “Game of Thrones.”

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EW – Richard Madden is used to playing men responsible for the lives of others in perilous positions, but have his characters gotten any better at protecting those around them?

In the BBC’s Bodyguard, created and written by Jed Mercurio — perhaps best known for tense, crime procedural drama Line of Duty — Game of Thrones alum Madden stars as police officer and PTSD-suffering war veteran David Budd, who is assigned as a protection officer to the U.K.’s controversial Home Secretary Julia Montague (played by Line Of Duty’s Keeley Hawes). While a divided government deals with a heightened terrorist threat in the country, Budd has his own demons to work through — and Montague doesn’t make his job any easier.

As the Home Secretary aims to introduce a new bill that outlines increased state surveillance, Budd grapples to protect her from those opposed to such legislation as well as the greater threat of domestic terrorism that pervades London and the rest of the country. Throw into the mix his own traumatic past and a young family to look after, and PPO (personal protection officer) Budd is in for a ride that makes the horror of Robb Stark’s Red Wedding look, well, still horrific, but also like another day at the office for the protection officer.

Originally broadcast in the U.K. in late August on the BBC, the show’s electric pace and edge-of-your-seat suspense kept audiences talking incessantly about the drama (and blowing up text threads on Sunday nights!), before tuning in with bated breath weekly, only to be thrown for another loop by the multitude of careening twists and turns, and perpetually unsure who to trust.

Ahead of the show’s Netflix debut, EW caught up with Madden — who also stars in next summer’s Elton John fantasy Rocketman — to learn more about his mercurial character, that (potentially!) explosive opening sequence, and whether David Budd would’ve been any good at protecting the doomed Stark family members.

 

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DEADLINE – After finding huge success in the United Kingdom, Bodyguard will make its way stateside on October 24 when it debuts on Netflix. The new trailer for the political thriller dropped today and features a wild amount of tensions rising between Game Of Thrones alum Richard Madden and Line Of Duty‘s Keeley Hawes.

Set in and around the corridors of power, Bodyguard tells the story of David Budd (Madden), a heroic, but volatile war veteran now working as a Specialist Protection Officer for the Royalty and Specialist Branch (RasP) of London’s Metropolitan Police Service. When he is assigned to protect the ambitious and powerful Home Secretary Julia Montague (Hawes), Budd finds himself torn between his duty and his beliefs. Responsible for her safety, could he become her biggest threat?

The series also stars Gina McKee (Line of Duty), Sophie Rundle (Peaky Blinders), Vincent Franklin (Happy Valley), Pippa Haywood (Scott & Bailey), Stuart Bowman (Versailles) and Paul Ready (The Terror).

Bodyguard is produced by World Productions, an ITV Studios company. The series is executive produced by Jed Mercurio (Line of Duty, Bodies), Simon Heath (Line of Duty, Save Me, The Great Train Robbery) for World Productions and Elizabeth Kilgarriff for BBC directed by Thomas Vincent and John Strickland, and produced by Eric Coulter and Priscilla Parish.



   

 

Public Appearances > 2018 > October 15: ‘The Bodyguard’ Press Conference