Welcome to Richard Madden Fan at www.richard-madden.com, your first and original fansource for the talented scottish actor Richard Madden. He's best known for playing Robb Stark in HBO's Game of Thrones and Prince Kit in Disney's Cinderella. His recent projects have been Netflix's Medici: Masters of Florence where he playes Cosimo deMedici, two Amazon Prime's series. Oasis and Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams, and Netflix's original movie, Ibiza. Later this year, he has a BBC series Bodyguard coming up.

Our aim is to provide you with the latest news on his career, media and pictures. Thanks for visiting and don't forget to keep checking back! If you have any questions, concerns or comments, then do not hesitate to get in touch with us!
Archive for the ‘Richard’ Category
AliKat   /   10.25.2018   /   0 Comments

EW – Richard Madden is used to playing men responsible for the lives of others in perilous positions, but have his characters gotten any better at protecting those around them?

In the BBC’s Bodyguard, created and written by Jed Mercurio — perhaps best known for tense, crime procedural drama Line of Duty — Game of Thrones alum Madden stars as police officer and PTSD-suffering war veteran David Budd, who is assigned as a protection officer to the U.K.’s controversial Home Secretary Julia Montague (played by Line Of Duty’s Keeley Hawes). While a divided government deals with a heightened terrorist threat in the country, Budd has his own demons to work through — and Montague doesn’t make his job any easier.

As the Home Secretary aims to introduce a new bill that outlines increased state surveillance, Budd grapples to protect her from those opposed to such legislation as well as the greater threat of domestic terrorism that pervades London and the rest of the country. Throw into the mix his own traumatic past and a young family to look after, and PPO (personal protection officer) Budd is in for a ride that makes the horror of Robb Stark’s Red Wedding look, well, still horrific, but also like another day at the office for the protection officer.

Originally broadcast in the U.K. in late August on the BBC, the show’s electric pace and edge-of-your-seat suspense kept audiences talking incessantly about the drama (and blowing up text threads on Sunday nights!), before tuning in with bated breath weekly, only to be thrown for another loop by the multitude of careening twists and turns, and perpetually unsure who to trust.

Ahead of the show’s Netflix debut, EW caught up with Madden — who also stars in next summer’s Elton John fantasy Rocketman — to learn more about his mercurial character, that (potentially!) explosive opening sequence, and whether David Budd would’ve been any good at protecting the doomed Stark family members.

 

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AliKat   /   09.27.2018   /   0 Comments

BBC – Hit BBC drama Bodyguard kept an average 10.4 million viewers on tenterhooks as the series drew to a close on Sunday.

The audience reached its peak – 11 million – in its final five minutes.

The overnight ratings make the show – the brainchild of Line of Duty creator Jed Mercurio – the most watched drama of the year so far.

In fact, it is the biggest overnight drama figure since 10.5 million saw Downton Abbey’s series two finale in November 2011.

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AliKat   /   09.12.2018   /   0 Comments

The BBC’s new Sunday-night TV drama has made Richard Madden the hottest actor on British TV. In more ways than one. Not that he sees it that way

 

  
 

 

SATURDAY TIMES – How much time are you spending thinking about Bodyguard? A lot, I bet. The new BBC thriller, about the relationship between an ambitious and unknowable home secretary and her PTSD-addled protection officer, was written by Jed Mercurio of Line of Duty fame, and was cynically and artfully designed to hook, obsess and fixate an audience into appointment viewing.

Bodyguard is made to steal us away from all newly acquired suit-yourself, binge-watch and content-stream habits, with charismatic heroes who might actually be despicable antiheroes and a succession of frenzied plot twists that simply must be consumed on the night lest someone catch you out with a spoiler on social media. Even if that doesn’t happen, even if your viewing isn’t partly ruined by a stray Facebook comment, watch an episode even a little late and find yourself locked out of all the best conversations, the most detailed post mortems, most frenetic speculations. Bodyguard is, in essence, a middle-aged Love Island, a reason to gather excitedly round the screen at the prescribed hour in a way that hasn’t really happened since the late Nineties.

Bloody hell, it’s good, I tell its star Richard Madden. The 32-year-old Glaswegian actor made his name as Robb Stark in Game of Thrones and consolidated it as Prince Charming in 2015’s Kenneth Branagh-directed Cinderella. Now, after playing Mellors in Mercurio’s 2015 Lady Chatterley’s Lover for the BBC, he trembles on the verge of Poldarking himself into borderline indecent, heavily fetishised glory as Bodyguard’s David Budd, the protection officer at the heart of the story.

“Oh, right,” he says. His accent is broad, non-posh Scottish; unexpected to those who remember it as generically Yorkshire in Game of Thrones. His eyes are intense. He’s arch and funny; he’d probably qualify as dangerously charming if there weren’t also something watchful and cautious about him. “Thanks very much! I enjoyed playing something a bit more adult, less boyish. I’m keen to play more grown-up roles, without actually growing up myself. Pretending to be adult. I’m done playing princes. Princes and royalty and lords. Also, it’s nice not to do an accent.” David Budd is – conveniently – Scottish. “One less thing to think about. Shall we get a drink? It is a Tuesday night, after all.”

It’s a Monday, I point out, but all the same we order a beer and wine from the front desk of the photographic studio in which we sit.

This is not the first time Madden and I have met. Three years ago, he bowled up to me at a friend’s party and demanded to know why I hadn’t featured him in Grazia magazine’s Chart of Lust recently. A placing in the list (which I compile weekly, and does exactly as its title suggests – rates the most fanciable people of that moment’s news), is deeply coveted among those who present themselves as above that kind of vanity, but definitely aren’t. Newscasters, Hollywood A-listers, national treasures, disruptive artists (Grayson Perry once told me he’d pinned his mention up on the wall in his studio), award-winning novelists … I’ve been lobbied by spads chasing mentions for their political charges on more than one occasion. But this was the first time a candidate had ever approached me in the flesh. I was both impressed and amused by his front.

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AliKat   /   09.11.2018   /   0 Comments

   
 

Photoshoots & Portraits > Session 039 (2018 Mr. Porter)

 

The Scottish actor on objectification, roles in the “grey zones” and how he escapes the attention of being a star

 

MR PORTER – It has been a dizzying week for Mr Richard Madden as the reaction to his latest television series, Bodyguard, has intensified. The BBC’s delirious new primetime thriller – which stars Mr Madden in the title role — has generally been a ratings and critical hit. However, this being 2018, it wouldn’t do to not have a furore, and Bodyguard’s so far seems to revolve around the number of women shown in positions of power. In short: there’s too many, apparently, at least, according to many Twitterati – who felt this was an example of the BBC being unrealistically politically correct. (This despite the fact that until April 2018, the United Kingdom had a female prime minister, home secretary and Metropolitan Police commissioner.) Mr Madden, who is drily Scottish at the best of times, has no truck with misogynist trolls.

“I just thought: this is so fucking bananas!”, the 32-year-old exclaims over a light lunch. The usual healthy foods are complemented by a Diet Coke, a packet of cigarettes and a liberal use of the F-word that verges on the Rab C Nesbitt. “It’s not unrealistic at all to have these women in there – it’s completely normal.” It should be like that, he says. “Especially when the show focuses on a young white male. Let’s not forget that the camera is on a young white male the whole time.”

Handsome, affable and enjoyably cheeky, Mr Madden has thus far shuttled between two types of role: the romantic hero and the action ingénue. Sometimes he has done both at the same time – most famously playing Robb Stark in Game Of Thrones. He has played Prince Kit in Cinderella, and he has been Romeo on-stage, not once but twice. He has also bounced about and wielded a gun in Bastille Day, opposite Mr Idris Elba. Bodyguard has guns, but it’s the chance to expand his range that made him jump at the role. In the six-part series he plays David Budd, a bodyguard whose time as a soldier at war has left him suffering with PTSD. When Budd is assigned to protect a hostile, hawkish home secretary (Ms Keeley Hawes), we soon realise he may not actually want to protect her. Apart from those times when he’s in bed with her, of course.

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AliKat   /   08.30.2018   /   0 Comments

DIGITAL SPY – With Richard Madden’s volatile veteran David Budd eyeing every other character in BBC One’s Bodyguard with suspicion, it’s can be tricky to work out who’s actually up to no good.

But we’ve got some theories after a stunning second episode that saw Keeley Hawes’ formidable Home Secretary, Julia Montague, become the target of an assasination attempt, and later end up in bed with Budd.

 

Here’s what’s going to be keeping us up nights after the latest installment.

1. Who is behind the terror attacks?

With London under siege, the UK’s threat level soars across Bodyguard’s latest episode.

The investigation continues into the aborted October 1 bombing that Budd helped prevent, and while the culprit Nadia – apparently coerced by her husband – is “too intimidated to reveal much”, it’s suspected that the couple’s “accomplices… may still be at large”.

What’s more, the bomb used in the attack on Budd’s children’s school includes the same “sophisticated mechanisms” seen in Nadia’s device, suggesting that both operations were carried out by the same terror cell.

This is all part of something bigger.

2. Who is the leak?

The attack on the school was apparently a revenge plot, with the terror cell seeking retribution on Budd for thwarting their previous bombing.

How did the terrorists identify Budd as the officer in question? Honest(?) copper Anna Sampson (Gina McKee) argues that a witness at the scene of the train bombing, or an accomplice of Nadia’s, could have fingered Budd.

MI5, though suspects an “internal leak” within the police, and later – during the attempt on Julia’s life – the boys in blue are apparently given orders by “an executive officer at SO15” that prevent them from intervening.

Is there a police conspiracy out to get Budd? Was the intention of limiting police protection to have him and Julia knocked off in one fell swoop?

Or… could Julia have given the order herself? (More on our suspicions that the Home Secretary is actually a supervillain below.)

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